massarrah
massarrah:

Assyrian Relief from the Palace at Nineveh
Carved into a gypsum wall-panel from the South West Palace of the king Sennacherib at Nineveh, this relief shows two of the king’s bodyguards dressed in austere uniforms that nevertheless have fine details. Both figures exhibit features that suggest them to have been drawn from different parts of the extensive Neo-Assyrian empire. For example, although the one on the right bears a shield similar to those of Assyrian soldiers, his turban and kilt suggest him to be from Palestine or elsewhere nearby. (Source)
Neo-Assyrian, 700-659 BCE, Nineveh.
British Museum.

Beautiful details.

massarrah:

Assyrian Relief from the Palace at Nineveh

Carved into a gypsum wall-panel from the South West Palace of the king Sennacherib at Nineveh, this relief shows two of the king’s bodyguards dressed in austere uniforms that nevertheless have fine details. Both figures exhibit features that suggest them to have been drawn from different parts of the extensive Neo-Assyrian empire. For example, although the one on the right bears a shield similar to those of Assyrian soldiers, his turban and kilt suggest him to be from Palestine or elsewhere nearby. (Source)

Neo-Assyrian, 700-659 BCE, Nineveh.

British Museum.

Beautiful details.

twitchitywitchity
twitchitywitchity:

Originating from Mesopotamia, beryl was worshipped as a magic stone. It is said to protect marital feelings and love and will help the one who possesses it reach high positions.
It is a very gentle healer, helping with homesickness and anxiety caused by traveling. Beryl aids in treating eye problems, placing the stone on the closed eye in the evening. It can alleviate mild stomach and bowel disorders and detoxify the body. Beryl is used in the treatment of angina and can relieve the effects of long-term stress when placed on the neck. When worn with morganite, it can enhance the physical appeal and erotic feelings of the wearer.
Beryl is a protective stone, especially when travel over water as that is its corresponding element.
It should always be placed in a bowl of hematite stones overnight and cleansed under warm running water while rubbing lightly.
 Via: The Whimsical Pixie on Facebook.

twitchitywitchity:

Originating from Mesopotamia, beryl was worshipped as a magic stone. It is said to protect marital feelings and love and will help the one who possesses it reach high positions.

It is a very gentle healer, helping with homesickness and anxiety caused by traveling. Beryl aids in treating eye problems, placing the stone on the closed eye in the evening. It can alleviate mild stomach and bowel disorders and detoxify the body. Beryl is used in the treatment of angina and can relieve the effects of long-term stress when placed on the neck. When worn with morganite, it can enhance the physical appeal and erotic feelings of the wearer.

Beryl is a protective stone, especially when travel over water as that is its corresponding element.

It should always be placed in a bowl of hematite stones overnight and cleansed under warm running water while rubbing lightly.


Via: The Whimsical Pixie on Facebook.

In 1923, Wolley explored a site near Ur (Iraq) called Tell al-Ubaid.
He uncovered a temple 4500 years old. The temple had decayed, but Woolley found objects which may have decorated it.The temple was the home of the Sumerian goddess Ninhursag.(lady of the hill country).Woolley found mosaic columns which he thought might have framed the temple door. They are wooden with pieces of red limestone and mother of pearl glued in place using bitumen.

In 1923, Wolley explored a site near Ur (Iraq) called Tell al-Ubaid.

He uncovered a temple 4500 years old. The temple had decayed, but Woolley found objects which may have decorated it.The temple was the home of the Sumerian goddess Ninhursag.(lady of the hill country).Woolley found mosaic columns which he thought might have framed the temple door. They are wooden with pieces of red limestone and mother of pearl glued in place using bitumen.

isqineeha

A survey of ancient and modern amulets throughout the world surprisingly concludes that the image of the open right hand was a universally recognized and employed sign of protection from the early Mesopotamia amulets to the Qat Istar and the Qat Inana, the Mano Pantea, and the right hand of the Buddha in the mudra (gesture) of teaching or proaction, and the Hand of Fatima. The common and universal human experience of the emotions of jealousy and envy, of the dangers of pregnancy and childbirth, to the dependency upon the fertility of crops and herds undergird the reality behind the amulet of the open right hand. Throughout al of those cultures and religious traditions in which we find the open right, particularly as identified with a female personality of great energy and status, was the commonality for its use as protection in the “female” experiences of conception, pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation as well as within the boundaries of the domestic sphere, such as the nurture and care of children, the preparation of food, and so on. Beyond the varied species of stone or metal used to fabricate the amulet, there are functional differences in the use of the proactive open right hand.

The Qat Istar, also known as the Qat Inana, or Hand of Isthar/Inana, had no textual or scriptural basis among the Akkadians, Sumerians, and Mesopotamians who used it; nevertheless, it had specific meaning as the controller or seizer of diseases(s). Ironically, modern scholarship not only suggests the lack of textual basis for this amulet but also recognizes that the disease(s) from which the wearer of the Qat Istar (or Inana) was protected was classified as psychological of psychosomatic in nature.

Diane Apostolos-Cappadona on the Mesopotamian origins of the Hand of Fatima amulet. Published in Beyond The Exotic: Women’s Histories in Islamic Societies by Amira El Azhary Sonbol 
(via isqineeha)